Whoa, another post here

Frankie Bushell

During my first year of college, I told my teacher that I used clip art. He replied, “We don’t use clip art, we make clip art.” It was surprising to learn that I could create something original instead of using something made by another person—and that was the idea that led me to photography.

In 2005, during my last year of college, everyone in my class was scanning and using the same stock imagery book whenever we needed visuals for an assignment. For instance, if we worked on a project for apple pie packaging, everyone used the same photograph of an apple. I wanted to create my own original stock photos, so I decided to buy a camera—once I started taking pictures, I never put the camera down. That is how I fell in love with photography.

“…everyone in my class was scanning and using the same stock imagery book whenever we needed visuals for an assignment…I wanted to create my own original stock photos, so I decided to buy a camera—once I started taking pictures, I never put the camera down.”
Approaching graduation, I still needed about six more credits to graduate. At the same time, my grandfather, who had Alzheimer’s, had moved in with my family. My parents were trying to decide who was going to stay home and take care of my grandfather. By that time, I had all the skills I needed to design, so I volunteered to stay home and watch Grandpa rather than going back to college for the summer. Since I had less than nine credits to complete, which I had planned to take that summer, I was allowed to walk across the platform with my graduating class. In that sense, I did “graduate” and my parents got to see me in my cap and gown.

Holy Shit that was the best time I have ever had. I will be going every year until I die. No doubt this is the best thing that has ever happened to me or anyone in my family!
— Splifany Hoobadank

After that, I started working from home as a freelance designer and I picked up freelance photography jobs here and there. Soon after, I was hired as an in-house photographer for Threadless. At the time, they had a deal where, if you bought a t-shirt and posted a photo of yourself wearing it, you were given five dollars off of your next purchase. I did that enough times and took good enough images that I gradually developed a rapport with them. In 2007, I was hired by their parent company, skinnyCorp, to move out to Chicago to work as an in-house photographer. It was amazing!

Here is a test blog post

Frankie Bushell

Describe your path to becoming a photographer?
I knew I would do something in a creative field because, somehow, I was always involved in the arts when I was a kid. I took a lot of art classes and enjoyed using computers to design t-shirts with clip art; in high school, I played in the marching band as a drum major and sang in a traveling choir.

My first experience with a camera was when I was five years old and my mom bought me a Mickey Mouse Polaroid camera. We were living in Bridgeport, Connecticut, and Hurricane Andrew had just come through, knocking down a huge oak tree in our front yard. Once the storm passed, I asked my mom if I could go outside and take photos with my camera. My mom replied, “Don’t drop your camera,” and I thought, “I’m not going to drop it—I’m five.” I walked outside and, as soon as I saw the tree, I immediately dropped the camera into a puddle of water. I could feel my mom’s breath on my neck from 20 feet away. That one moment made me afraid to touch another camera until I was in college!

I knew I would go to college, but didn’t know how’d I get there. My sister and I were around the same age, and I went with her to a college fair one day. That’s when I found out about an area of study that merged art and computers: it was called graphic design. I didn’t know there was such a thing, and finding that out changed everything for me. I realized that that was what I wanted to do, so I went to Central Connecticut State University to study design.

Describe your path to becoming a photographer?
I knew I would do something in a creative field because, somehow, I was always involved in the arts when I was a kid. I took a lot of art classes and enjoyed using computers to design t-shirts with clip art; in high school, I played in the marching band as a drum major and sang in a traveling choir.

My first experience with a camera was when I was five years old and my mom bought me a Mickey Mouse Polaroid camera. We were living in Bridgeport, Connecticut, and Hurricane Andrew had just come through, knocking down a huge oak tree in our front yard. Once the storm passed, I asked my mom if I could go outside and take photos with my camera. My mom replied, “Don’t drop your camera,” and I thought, “I’m not going to drop it—I’m five.” I walked outside and, as soon as I saw the tree, I immediately dropped the camera into a puddle of water. I could feel my mom’s breath on my neck from 20 feet away. That one moment made me afraid to touch another camera until I was in college!

I knew I would go to college, but didn’t know how’d I get there. My sister and I were around the same age, and I went with her to a college fair one day. That’s when I found out about an area of study that merged art and computers: it was called graphic design. I didn’t know there was such a thing, and finding that out changed everything for me. I realized that that was what I wanted to do, so I went to Central Connecticut State University to study design.